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Benefits Of Literature Based Research Paper

References

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Akerson, V. L., Flick, L. B., & Lederman, N. G. (2000). The influence of primary children's ideas in science on tea

Akerson, V. L., Flick, L. B., & Lederman, N. G. (2000). The influence of primary children's ideas in science on teaching practice. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 37(4), 363—385.

American Association for the Advancement of Science. (1989). Science for all Americans: A Project 2061 report on literacy goals in science, mathematics, and technology. Washington, DC: Author.

Anderson, E. (1998). Motivational and cognitive influences on conceptual knowledge: The combination of science observation and interesting texts (Doctoral dissertation, University of Maryland, College Park). Dissertation Abstracts International, 59(06), 1913A.

Bruning, R., & Schweiger, B. M. (1997). Integrating science and literacy experiences to motivate student learning. In J. T. Guthrie & A. Wigfield (Eds.), Reading engagement: Motivating readers through integrated instruction (pp. 149—167). Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Butts, D. P., Koballa, T., Anderson, M., & Butts, D. P. (1993). Relationship between teacher intentions and their classroom use of Superscience. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 2(1), 349—357. Cobern, W. W., & Loving, C. C. (2002). Investigation ofpreservice elementary teachers' thinking about science. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 39(10), 1016—1031.

Donovan, C. A.,& Smolkin, L. B. (2001). Genre and other factors influencing teachers' book selections for science instruction. Reading Research Quarterly, 36, 412—440

.

Flick, L. B. (1995). Navigating a sea of ideas: Teacher and students negotiate a course toward mutual relevance. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 32(10), 1065—1082.

Kelly, G. J., Brown, C., & Crawford, T. (2000). Experiments, contingencies, and curriculum: Providing opportunities for learning through improvisation in science teaching. Science Education, 84, 624—657.

Lee, C. A., & Houseal, A. (2003). Self-efficacy, standards, and benchmarks as factors in teaching elementary school science. Journal of Elementary Science Education, 15(1), 37—55.

Mayer, D. A. (1995). How can we best use literature in teaching science concepts? Science and Children, 32, 16—19, 43.

Morrison, J. A., & Young, T. A. (2008). Using science trade books to support inquiry in the elementary classroom. Childhood Education, 84(4), 204—208.

National Science Teachers Association. (1996). National science education standards (Position statement). Retrieved January 20, 2010, from http://www.nsta.org/about/positions/standards.aspx

National Science Teachers Association. (2002). Elementary school science (Position statement). Retrieved January 20, 2010, from http://www.nsta.org/positionstatement&psid=8

Newton, L. D., Newton, D. P., Blake, A., & Brown, K. (2002). Do primary school science books for children show a concern for explanatory understanding? Research in Science & Technological Education, 20(2), 227—240.

Nuthall, G. (2001). Understanding how classroom experience shapes students' minds. Unterrichtswissenschaft, 29(3), 224—267.

Peacock, A., & Gates, S. (2000). Newly qualified primary teachers' perceptions of the role of text material in teaching science. Research in Science & Technological Education, 18(2), 155—171.

Vaughn, M. N., Sumrall, J., & Rose, L. H. (1998). Preservice teachers use the newspaper to teach science and social studies literacy. Journal of Elementary Science Education, 10(2), 1—9.

Vosniadou, S., Ioannides, C., Dimitrakopoulou, A., & Papademetriou, E. (2001). Designing learning environments to promote conceptual change in science. Learning and Instruction, 11, 381—419.

ching practice. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 37(4), 363-385.

American Association for the Advancement of Science. (1989). Science for all Americans: A Project 2061 report on literacy goals in science, mathematics, and technology. Washington, DC: Author.

Anderson, E. (1998). Motivational and cognitive influences on conceptual knowledge: The combination of science observation and interesting texts (Doctoral dissertation, University of Maryland, College Park). Dissertation Abstracts International, 59(06), 1913A.

Bruning, R., & Schweiger, B. M. (1997). Integrating science and literacy experiences to motivate student learning. In J. T. Guthrie & A. Wigfield (Eds.), Reading engagement: Motivating readers through integrated instruction (pp. 149-167). Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Butts, D. P., Koballa, T., Anderson, M., & Butts, D. P. (1993). Relationship between teacher intentions and their classroom use of Superscience. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 2(1), 349-357. Cobern, W. W., & Loving, C. C. (2002). Investigation ofpreservice elementary teachers' thinking about science. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 39(10), 1016-1031.

Donovan, C. A.,& Smolkin, L. B. (2001). Genre and other factors influencing teachers' book selections for science instruction. Reading Research Quarterly, 36, 412-440

.

Flick, L. B. (1995). Navigating a sea of ideas: Teacher and students negotiate a course toward mutual relevance. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 32(10), 1065-1082.

Kelly, G. J., Brown, C., & Crawford, T. (2000). Experiments, contingencies, and curriculum: Providing opportunities for learning through improvisation in science teaching. Science Education, 84, 624-657.

Lee, C. A., & Houseal, A. (2003). Self-efficacy, standards, and benchmarks as factors in teaching elementary school science. Journal of Elementary Science Education, 15(1), 37-55.

Mayer, D. A. (1995). How can we best use literature in teaching science concepts? Science and Children, 32, 16-19, 43.

Morrison, J. A., & Young, T. A. (2008). Using science trade books to support inquiry in the elementary classroom. Childhood Education, 84(4), 204-208.

National Science Teachers Association. (1996). National science education standards (Position statement). Retrieved January 20, 2010, from http://www.nsta.org/about/positions/standards.aspx

National Science Teachers Association. (2002). Elementary school science (Position statement). Retrieved January 20, 2010, from http://www.nsta.org/positionstatement&psid=8

Newton, L. D., Newton, D. P., Blake, A., & Brown, K. (2002). Do primary school science books for children show a concern for explanatory understanding? Research in Science & Technological Education, 20(2), 227-240.

Nuthall, G. (2001). Understanding how classroom experience shapes students' minds. Unterrichtswissenschaft, 29(3), 224-267.

Peacock, A., & Gates, S. (2000). Newly qualified primary teachers' perceptions of the role of text material in teaching science. Research in Science & Technological Education, 18(2), 155-171.

Vaughn, M. N., Sumrall, J., & Rose, L. H. (1998). Preservice teachers use the newspaper to teach science and social studies literacy. Journal of Elementary Science Education, 10(2), 1-9.

Vosniadou, S., Ioannides, C., Dimitrakopoulou, A., & Papademetriou, E. (2001). Designing learning environments to promote conceptual change in science. Learning and Instruction, 11, 381-419.

If the point of a research project is solely to review what has already been written on a topic, the resulting article is termed a "survey of the literature" or a "literature survey" or even a "literature review." In this case, the article is complete in itself and does not delve into anything new regarding the topic. A literature survey might end with a discussion of what work is still needed to further develop knowledge of a particular topic, but it does not, itself, flesh out any of those ideas. Articles of this type can be highly beneficial to someone seeking to launch an original study; literature surveys have already laid some of the groundwork for a prospective researcher's own literature review.

When the survey serves as the initial step that precedes a further investigation of an idea or ideas about a topic, then that review of the literature sets the stage for the presentation of original research. Original research usually involves the selection of a methodology for examining a topic and may include the gathering of data that can be further analyzed to arrive at assumptions about the topic. Data may be derived from the examination of human subjects, from conducting surveys or assessments, from the study of particular species of plants or animals, from the systematic scientific measurement of any physical phenomena, from nearly anything that can be documented and analyzed. Again, the whole point of launching an original study is to learn something new about a topic. Research typically begins with what is known (the literature review) and progresses into analyzing, through the observation and analysis of data, what is yet to be known through further study.

Both the literature survey and the original study are considered academic articles, as opposed to popular articles. Both involve research in order to come to a better understanding of a topic.

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