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Teaching The Cause And Effect Essay Example

Cause-and-effect can be a tricky reading strategy to teach and to learn. While it may seem so intuitive to us as adults, oftentimes our students find it more challenging. Here are a few cause-and-effect lesson plans and starter ideas that are simple but effective (wink) to help your students master this reading concept.

1. Make an anchor chart.

As you introduce cause-and-effect, an anchor chart can help reinforce the concept. They’re great to refer back to when reviewing and are helpful for kids to look at when working independently.

One thing to emphasize is that the cause is why something happened. The cause always happens first, even if it isn’t mentioned first. The effect is what happened and it occurs after the cause.

2. Show concrete examples.

Gather a few items to use as cause-and-effect examples ahead of time. You could push a row of dominoes, turn a light switch on, pop a balloon, roll a ball, drop a Hot Wheel car down a ramp and so on. As you (or even better, a student) demonstrate these examples, ask your kids the cause and the effect for each.

3. Discuss real-life examples.

Give your class real scenarios and ask what would happen. You might say, If you left an ice cube on the hot sidewalk during the summer, what would happen? Then have students determine the cause and effect.

Continue asking similar questions using the same frame of if (the cause) and what (the effect). For example, if you ate too much candy at one time, what would happen? If you practiced playing the piano every day, what would happen? If you never brushed your teeth, what would happen? To add some fun, you might even make it silly (if you have a class who can handle that). Maybe, If an elephant jumped into a tiny pool, what would happen? Or If you saw an alien, what would happen?

4. Act out with role-play.

Prepare slips of paper ahead of time with ideas for students to act out. Tell the kids that they may make sound effects but may not use words. You can call for volunteers right away or better yet, put the actors into small groups and give them 5 to 10 minutes to practice before showing the class.

The situations you include could be: You’re playing baseball and a window breaks, you’re blowing a big chewing gum bubble and it pops on your face, a football team makes a touchdown and the crowd cheers, you jump on the bed and get scolded, you fall down while ice skating and break your arm, or you run fast and earn a trophy, and so on. After every scenario is performed, the class can identify the cause and the effect.

5. Matchsentence strips.

Ahead of time, write causes on sentence strips and matching effects on other sentence strips. Make sure there are enough for your whole class. Pass out a sentence strip to each child with either a cause or an effect.

When you say “Go,” have the kids walk around until they find a match. When they’re done, they can quickly share out their answers. This cause-and-effect lesson plan is a great way to get kids out of their seats and moving.

6. Play cause-and-effect cards in pairs.

Cut 3×4-inch cards from two different colors of construction paper. Once kids are in pairs, give each child two cards of each color. One color is for the causes (I tell the kids to write a “C” on the back of these to help them remember) and the other color cards are for the effects (write an “E” on the back of these).

Next, the pairs work together to come up with four different cause-and-effect events to record on their cards. For example, on one cause card, it might say: The mother bird sat on her nest. The effect card that matches it might say: The baby birds hatched out of their eggs. Or cause: It started to rain. Effect: We took out our umbrellas. Once the pair has finished their cards, they mix them up, place them in an envelope and write their names on the front.

The next day, set the envelopes around the room like a scavenger hunt and have pairs travel around the room with their partners to open envelopes, match causes and effects, mix the cards back up, put them back in the envelope, and move to the next open set. An alternative is to use the envelopes as a cause-and-effect center.

7. Produce flip books.

These little books can be used in cause-and-effect lesson plans and much more! You might want to prep them for little ones, but older kids can usually make their own. Fold a 9×12-inch paper lengthwise (hot dog–style). Keep it folded and use a ruler to mark off the 3-inch, 6-inch and 9-inch spots near the top and bottom.

Draw a line from the top to the bottom at each marked spot. Unfold the page and cut on the three lines from the bottom to the fold. Once the flip book is created, kids draw four causes on the front and then lift each flap and draw four effects underneath. Need enrichment for higher-level kids? Have them draw or write several effects for each cause!

8.Make cause-and-effect pictures.

Take 9×12 construction paper (landscape format) and have kids fold it in half and then unfold it. Write “Cause” at the top of the left side and “Effect” at the top of the right side. Kids use crayons, markers, sharpies or watercolors to create a picture that shows a cause-and-effect relationship.

9. Create cause-and-effect cards.

Similar to the above cause-and-effect lesson plan, but instead of unfolding the paper, just leave it folded like a greeting card. I actually like to make the cards fairly small and then they can be grouped together in a little cause-and-effect museum for a fun display. The cards just have to be big enough that the kids can draw or write on them.

10. Use pictures for students to infer cause and effect.

This cause-and-effect lesson plan could be done after kids have mastered the basics. Gather some interesting pictures from classroom magazines (Scholastic, Weekly Reader) and regular magazines, or find them online on free-to-use sites like Pixabay. Look for pictures that have a lot going on in them because kids are going to be looking for several causes and effects, not just one. I would suggest NOT letting the kids search for pictures. Not everything is classroom friendly and even if they were, it could be a distraction.

Glue the picture to the top of a piece of construction paper (portrait format) or a piece of chart paper. Underneath the picture, divide the space in half and write “Cause” at the top of the left side and “Effect” at the top of the right side. Kids brainstorm and write down lots of different causes and effects for the same picture by looking at it in many ways.

11. More pictures for multiple causes or effects.

For this activity, find pictures as before, but this time, glue the picture to the center of the paper. Write “Cause” above the picture, as well as a word or two explaining the cause. Then kids draw arrows away from the picture and write possible effects.

For example, if the picture is of a sunny beach, the cause is the hot sun. Some possible effects might be that the sand is hot, people get sunburned, kids jump in the water to cool off, people sit under umbrellas to stay cool, people put on sunscreen, and so on.

Another day, use different pictures and repeat the activity, but switch it so the word “Effect” is above the picture, as well as a word or two explaining the effect. The arrows this time point towards the effect and demonstrate causes. For example, if the picture was of spilled milk, the effect is the milk spilled. The causes might be a cat bumped into it, a baby tried to drink from it, it was too close to the edge of the table, a mom poured too much by mistake, kids were playing ball in the house and the ball hit it, etc.

12. Have a scavenger hunt.

Gather baskets of picture books with strong cause-and-effect examples. Make sure to select books, either fiction or nonfiction, that target your standard. Kids may work alone or in pairs to read one of the books and find cause-and-effect relationships. Make sure students have either Post-it notes, paper, or a cause-and-effect template (one side for causes and one for effects) to record their findings. This activity may be repeated several times, with students using different books.

Do you have any favorite cause-and-effect lesson plans? Please share in the comments below—we’d love to hear your ideas too!

 


Cause and Effect Topics

When selecting your topic for this essay, you should find an event, trend, or phenomenon that has a fairly obvious cause and effect. You can pick very big topics like World War II and attribute a cause and effect to it by not exploring every possible reason why it started and what its effects were. Just pick a few causes and effects that you can attribute to it and make some notes before you start writing.

For example, let’s say that you’ve chosen the October Revolution of 1917 as your topic. What are some key elements to this event? There are MANY but let’s pick war, living conditions, and political repression. Now let’s break these down further:

War: The Russian Empire had already killed off many of its young soldiers in the Russo-Japanese War in 1905 and in the early years of World War I. The Provisional Government that came after the monarchy in February 1917 didn’t do much better in WWI. This resulted in people being angry about losing so many soldiers and resources for the war effort.

Living Conditions: Life for both the peasants in the countryside and the workers in the city was abysmal. This went hand in hand with an elite who used up many of the country’s wealth for their own personal pleasure. This resulted in people being angry for having so little while others had so much.

Political Repression: There was no political freedom in the Russian Empire. There was no “real” constitution, parliament, or elections that weren’t controlled by either the monarchy or later by the Provisional Government. Because of political repression, anyone who disagreed with the status quo was subjected to arrest, exile, or execution. People wanted more freedoms like other citizens had in Western Europe.

Other Cause and Effect Essay Topics

  • How divorce effects children
  • Why some friendships end
  • The effect of the American Civil War on race relations in the US
  • The effect of birth control on the Sexual Revolution
  • The effects of poverty on people’s psychology
  • Why first-year college roommates rarely get along
  • The positive effects of a healthy lifestyle
  • Why some romantic partners cheat
  • How second-wave feminism effected gender relations between men and women
  • The effects of drugs on prenatal development

How to Write a Cause and Effect Essay

Now that you have selected a suitable topic, you can begin to write your cause and effect essay.

Step 1: You need to explain the effects by making appropriate links to the causes. This is where your breakdown of the topic will help you.
Step 2: Be sure to only focus on a few points. Too many will overcomplicate everything for your reader.
Step 3: Organize your essay
  • Begin with your thesis statement. It should state the event, phenomenon, or trend that you want to explore in your essay.
  • All of the other paragraphs should begin with topic sentences that explore one of the cause and effect aspects. In the October 1917 example, you discuss the war's cause and effects in one paragraph.
  • End your essay by drawing your discussion together neatly.

Cause and Effect Essay Examples

The causes and effects of the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution in Russia are enough to fill volumes upon volumes of text. However, I will explore three main causes of this revolution. These were namely war, terrible living conditions, and political repression. While there were other factors involved, these three basic causes created ripple effects that left almost no one in the former Russian Empire untouched and a country ripe for further revolution…

Many people wonder what caused the writer Fyodor Dostoevsky to transform from a potential revolutionary to a fervent skeptic of revolution and an ardent Russian Orthodox Christian. Pivotal moments in the writer’s life played a role in his transformation. This included the murder of his father by his peasants, his near execution that was only stopped on the tsar’s orders, his imprisonment and exile in Omsk, and his battle with poverty. Due to all of these factors, Dostoevsky was changed not only as a person, but as a writer as well…
  • Spelling,Grammar,Punctuation
  • Plagiarism
  • Proper formatting

 

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